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Recommendations for Securing Data at Rest


Delete Global Read Access and Assign Finer-Grained Access Controls

When the RadiantOne service receives a request, it uses the user in the bind operation, and the access control instructions (ACIs) defined to allow or deny access to directory information. The service can allow or deny permissions such as read, write, search, or compare.

With ACI, you can control access to targets such as:

  • the entire RadiantOne namespace
  • a specific subtree
  • specific entries in the RadiantOne namespace
  • a specific set of entry attributes
  • specific entry attribute values.

You can define access to the following subjects:

  • a particular user
  • all users who belong to a specific group
  • all users in the directory

Access controls are set from the Main Control Panel > Settings Tab > Security section > Access Control sub-section.

By default, all users have read access to all naming contexts in RadiantOne for search, compare, and read operations. This includes read access to the RadiantOne directory RootDSE (accessible by requested an empty base DN).

This default access control can be removed from the Main Control Panel -> Settings Tab > Security section > Access Control. Click root on the right and select the configured access control described as “grant read access to anyone”. Then click Delete.

If you choose not to delete the grant access to anyone control, it is recommended for security reasons that you ensure that userpassword is not returned. You can do so as shown in the following example ACI.

(targetattr != "aci || userPassword")(target = "ldap:///")(targetscope = "subtree")(version 3.0;acl "grant read access to anyone";allow (read,compare,search) (userdn = "ldap:///anyone");)

If you do not want to return the userPassword attribute for anyone other than self, you can do so as shown in the following example ACI.

(targetattr = "userPassword")(target = "ldap:///")(targetscope = "subtree")(version 3.0;acl "Allow Access to userPassword to self";allow (all) (userdn = "ldap:///self");)

dictates RootDSE access. Below is an example of allowing public access to the RootDSE:

"RootDSE accessible to public"; allow (read,search,compare) userdn="ldap:///anyone";)

Although there is not an absolute requirement, it is generally recommended to define all your access controls at the root level so you can come back to this single level and see all configured access controls across the entire RadiantOne namespace. When you define the actual ACI at the root level, you can set the Target DN to only the applicable branch in the namespace you want to protect.

For details on defining access controls, please see the RadiantOne System Administration Guide.


Turn on Bind Requires Password Setting

If the Bind Requires Password setting is enabled, and no password is specified in the bind request, the RadiantOne service tries to bind the specified user and returns an invalid credential error to the client.

If Bind Requires Password is not enabled, and a bind request comes in with a valid user DN and no password, it is considered an anonymous bind.

This setting can be enabled from Main Control Panel > Settings tab > Security section > Access Control. Check the Bind requires a password option.


Define Strong Password Policies

RadiantOne offers advanced password policy settings to control everything from password strength, account locking and expiration, and grace logins. For more details, see Configure Strong Password Policies.


Use Multi-Factor Authentication

Configure your corporate OIDC provider from Main Control Panel > Settings > Security > OIDC Provider Configuration. The OIDC provider should be configured to support the desired MFA vendor.


Use Least Privilege Accounts for Backend Connections

RadiantOne connects to backends using the credentials defined in the data sources. When defining data sources, use credentials associated with an account that has the needed permissions required by RadiantOne. For example, if the backend information exposed in the RadiantOne namespace is to be read-only, use credentials for a read-only account in the data source. If certain attributes exposed in the RadiantOne namespace must be updateable by clients, use an account with permissions to update this information in the backend when defining the data source. It is always recommended to use least privilege accounts in the RadiantOne data source configurations.


Encrypt Attributes in RadiantOne Universal Directory Stores

Attribute encryption protects sensitive data while it is stored in RadiantOne Universal Directory stores. You can specify that certain attributes of an entry are stored in an encrypted format. This prevents data from being readable while stored in the RadiantOne Universal Directory stores, backup files, and exported LDIF files. Attribute values are encrypted before they are stored, and decrypted before being returned to the client, as long as the client is authorized to read the attribute (based on ACLs defined in RadiantOne), is connected to RadiantOne via SSL and not a member of the special group containing members not allowed to get these attributes (e.g. cn=ClearAttributesOnly,cn=globalgroups,cn=config). For details on this special group, please see the RadiantOne System Administration Guide.

You can use your own security key (Customer Master Key) for attribute encryption via AWS KMS. For details on using AWS KMS, see the RadiantOne System Administration Guide.

For details on configuring attribute encryption, see the RadiantOne Namespace Configuration Guide.


Use Zipped and Encrypted LDIF Files

When exporting (or initializing) RadiantOne Universal Directory stores or persistent cache stores, choose to use LDIFZ file types (which are zipped and encrypted) instead of classic LDIF files. LDIFZ files are encrypted using the security key defined in RadiantOne. For details on creating a security key, see the RadiantOne System Administration Guide.

You can use your own security key (Customer Master Key) for attribute encryption via AWS KMS. For details on using AWS KMS, see the RadiantOne System Administration Guide.

For details on exporting Universal Directory stores using LDIFZ, see the RadiantOne Namespace Configuration Guide. For details on exporting persistent cache stores using LDIFZ, see the RadiantOne Deployment and Tuning Guide.


Avoid Displaying Sensitive Attributes in Log Files

Configure sensitive attributes in the Main Control Panel > Settings > Server Front End > Attribute Handling -> Attributes Not Displayed in Logs setting. This property allows you to control which attribute values are not printed in clear in the RadiantOne logs. If you do not want certain attribute values printed in clear in the logs, you can indicate them here. Each attribute name should be separated with a single space. Any attribute indicated here has a value of ***** printed in the logs instead of the value in clear.

the following line from each method to avoid cleartext passwords being written to log files: prop.list(System.out)


Avoid Displaying Sensitive Changelog Attributes

When entries change, the change log reports the attributes under its "changes" attribute. This may pose a security risk if sensitive attributes have been changed and the change log is searchable by outside applications such as sync connectors. To eliminate this risk, the Excluded Change Log Attributes option allows you to exclude selected attributes from members of the “ChangelogAllowedAttributesOnly” group. Though these attributes are logged in the change log, they are not returned for these group members when performing a search on the change log. For more information, refer to the RadiantOne System Administration Guide.


Secure Access to the Global Sync Queues

For Global Sync deployments, the Agent and Sync Engine process read and/or write into the queues using the credentials configured in the RadiantOne data source named: vdsha

You can view this data source configuration from Main Control Panel > Settings > Server Backend > LDAP Data Sources.

For security reasons, the user account (Bind DN) you have configured in the vdsha data source should be the only one allowed to access the cn=queue and cn=dlqueue naming contexts.

Configure access controls for these root naming contexts from Main Control Panel > Settings > Security > Access Control. Access should only be allowed for the account configured in the vdsha data source. For details on configuring access controls, see the RadiantOne System Administration Guide.


Enable FIPS Mode

For details on deploying RadiantOne in FIPS-mode, to ensure all cryptographic operations are performed using a FIPS 140-2 certified module, see the RadiantOneFIPS_Mode Guide.

Once FIPS-mode is enabled, go to the Main Control Panel -> Settings tab -> Security -> Attribute Encryption and define the security keys for attribute encryption and LDIFZ attribute encryption.

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RadiantOne Universal Directory (HDAP) Stores Attribute Encryption

Attribute encryption protects sensitive data while it is stored in RadiantOne. Attribute encryption allows you to specify that certain attributes of an entry are stored in an encrypted format. This prevents data from being readable while stored in RadiantOne Universal Directory stores, persistent cache, backup files, and exported LDIF files.

There are two items to configure. One is the criteria for the key generation used to encrypt/decrypt the attributes. Two is the list of attributes you want to encrypt.

Key Generation

To define the criteria used to generate an encryption key:

  1. Navigate to Main Control Panel > Settings Tab > Security section > Attribute Encryption sub-section.
  2. On the right, click Define Key Generation.
  3. Select the desired cipher from the drop-down list.
  4. Enter a security key. This value is used to auto-generate an encryption key. If you plan on deploying multiple clusters that will participate in inter-cluster replication for encrypted attributes, take note of the value you enter here as you must use it when configuring the security key in the other clusters.

An encryption key is auto-generated based on the cipher and security key value provided. This key is used across nodes in a cluster to encrypt/decrypt the attributes configured for encryption. If inter-cluster replication is deployed, all clusters must be configured with the same cipher and security key.

Attributes to Encrypt

No attributes are encrypted by default. To configure a list of attributes to encrypt:

  1. Navigate to the RadiantOne Universal Directory (HDAP) store (or configured persistent cache branch) on the Main Control Panel > Directory Namespace tab.
  2. Enter a comma-separated list of attribute names in the Encrypted Attributes property.
  3. Click Save.
  4. Click the Re-build Index button (if your configuration is an RadiantOne Universal Directory Store) or the Initialize button to reinitialize the cache (if your configuration is a Persistent Cache).

Attributes listed in the Encrypted Attributes property are added to the Non-indexed attribute list by default. This means these attributes are not searchable by clients. Indexing encrypted attributes is generally not advised as the index itself is less secure than the attribute stored in Universal Directory stores/persistent cache. However, if you must be able to search on the encrypted attribute value, it needs indexed. Only “exact match/equality” index is supported for encrypted attributes. To make an encrypted attribute searchable, remove the attribute from the list of nonindexed attributes and click the Re-build Index button or the Initialize button (to reinitialize) if the branch is a persistent cache.

For more information about accessing encrypted attributes and changing the encryption key, see the RadiantOne System Administration Guide.

LDIF File Encryption

Using the LDIFZ format when exporting RadiantOne Universal Directory (HDAP) stores produces a zipped and encrypted LDIF file. This prevents data from being readable while stored in exported LDIF files.

Key Generation

To define the criteria used to generate an encryption key:

  1. Navigate to Main Control Panel > Settings Tab > Security section > Attribute Encryption sub-section.
  2. On the right, for LDIFZ Encryption Key, click Define Key Generation.
  3. Select the desired cipher from the drop-down list.
  4. Enter a security key. This value is used to auto-generate an encryption key. If you plan on deploying multiple clusters that will participate in inter-cluster replication and you are going to initialize stores from an exported LDIFZ file, take note of the value you enter here as you must use it when configuring the LDIFZ cipher and security key in the other clusters.

Using LDIFZ

In FIPS-mode, LDIFZ files should be used for persistent cache initialization (for the file that gets generated as the first step of the initialization process). Make sure the option to “Use .ldifz...” is selected during the initialization process.

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In FIPS-mode, LDIFZ files should be used when exporting RadiantOne Universal Directory (HDAP) or persistent cache. Select .ldifz from the drop-down list next to the Export File Name property.

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